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Los Angeles Dodgers 2015 Top Fantasy Prospects

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The prospect staff at Fake Teams continues their fantasy prospect rankings and system reviews with an in-depth look at the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Just like last year, the prospect staff here at Fake Teams will be taking an in-depth look at each major league organization, including our top 10 fantasy prospects, an overview of the organization's minor league system as a whole and potential opportunities for playing time in 2015. Our goal is to provide you with more information as you prepare for minor league drafts for dynasty and keeper leagues, as well as look at players that could potentially be worth watching during the spring, as they could be in line to potentially help your fantasy team. We will be reviewing two teams per week until we are through all 30 teams, and you can see the schedule of when your favorite team will be reviewed below. if we have already reviewed the team, a link to the post, along with the team's top prospect is noted.

System Schedule

AL East

AL Central

AL West

NL East

NL Central

NL West

Baltimore
(3/11)

Chicago
(2/11)

Houston
(1/14)

Atlanta
(12/10)

Chicago
(11/12)

Arizona
(Bradley)

Boston
(3/14)

Cleveland
(2/14)

Los Angeles
(1/17)

Miami
(12/13)

Cincinnati
(11/15)

Colorado
(Gray)

New York
(3/18)

Detroit
(2/18)

Oakland
(1/21)

New York
(12/17)

Milwaukee
(11/19)

Los Angeles
(Today)

Tampa Bay
(3/21)

Kansas City
(2/21)

Seattle
(1/24)

Philadelphia
(12/20)

Pittsburgh
(11/22)

San Diego
(10/29)

Toronto
(3/25)

Minnesota
(2/25)

Texas
(1/28)

Washington
(12/24)

St. Louis
(11/26)

San Francisco
(11/1)

Organizational Overview
by David Spracale

Yet another significant front office shakeup this offseason took place in Los Angeles. The Dodgers reassigned former GM, Ned Colletti and hired the brains behind the Tampa Bay Rays organization, Andrew Friedman to run baseball operations. Friedman's ability to build a competitive team on a small market budget is well chronicled, and it is going to be interesting to see what he does with a seemingly endless supply of cash being pumped into the Dodgers by the Guggenheim Group. To say the marriage of the analytically strong Friedman and the deep pockets of Dodgers' ownership is intriguing would be an understatement, and this hot stove season should be a really interesting time in the City of Angels.

Going into 2015, the Dodgers have some prospects that should make an impact at the Major League level. Joc Pederson is the top offensive prospect with a shot at breaking Spring Training with the big league club. Pederson has hit 73 home runs in the last three minor league seasons and will hopefully be able to show off that power upside as an everyday player in 2015. Corey Seager took a big leap forward in 2014 and should be one of the top offensive prospects in baseball when top-100 lists are released. Alex Guerrero, the Cuban middle infielder, was dealt a blow when Miguel Olivo did his best Hannibal Lecter impression and took a bite out of Guerrero's ear. However, questions about Guerrero's offensive ability still abound and I have very real concerns that he will ever be a productive Major Leaguer, especially after the performance Dee Gordon posted this past season.

The Dodgers' top pitching prospect is 18 year old Mexican left hander Julio Urias. Urias took a big step forward in 2014 because his velocity jumped from the mid 80s to the low to mid 90s, with a wipeout slider. Urias is another prospect that will see his prospect status climb going into 2015 and there will be calls to give him a shot. Right handed starter Zach Lee is solid in every way and should have ample opportunities to pitch in Los Angeles this season. Two other names to keep an eye on are 2013 and 2014 first-round picks, Chris Anderson and Grant Holmes, but more on all these pitchers later.

Overall, the Dodgers have some high end talent and a solid system that should be ready to impact the big league club in 2015 and 2016 as well as some really interesting sleepers that will be worthy of keeping an eye on throughout 2015. Anderson and Holmes could be used as early as 2015 to help a bullpen that was underwhelming all season but especially down the stretch. If Andrew Friedman stays true to his principles, we won't see the Dodgers selling off cost controlled talent to patch up holes on the big league roster. Instead, we should see the Dodgers slightly more aggressive with their prospects and let them come up to help the defending National League West champions.


2014 Graduates

The following players have surpassed their rookie maximums of 130 AB, 50 IP, or 45 days of service time.

Miguel Rojas (AB), Pedro Baez (IP), Chris Withrow (IP)

Major League Opportunities in 2015
by Dave Spracale

There is no question the Dodgers have elite top end starting pitching at the Major League level in (soon to be 3-time) Cy Young winner and possible National League MVP Clayton Kershaw, Zack Grienke and a solid #3 in Hyun-Jin Ryu. Josh Beckett has retired and Dan Haren was incredibly average. However, Haren reached the 180 innings needed to turn his $10 million option into a player option, and I would be shocked if he didn't exercise that option. The Dodgers rotation would then stand at Kershaw, Grienke, Ryu and Haren and an interesting candidate to fill the 5th rotation spot internally, in Zach Lee, if they don't open the wallets for a free agent starter. With Friedman at the helm, I believe the Dodgers will sign a low end free agent starter to compete with Lee, the only starter that is really ready for a shot at the Majors.

Zach Lee spent his entire age 22 season at Triple-A Albuquerque which is a hitters haven, but still the season was a bit of a disappointment. Lee's 2014 numbers raise some red flags, as he walked more hitters per nine (3.23) and struck out fewer hitters per nine (5.79) than he has at any stop along his minor league journey, but the Pacific Coast League inflates negative pitching numbers. Lee doesn't have elite stuff or velocity, but he has a solid three pitch mix and pitching in the pitcher friendly Dodger Stadium should help him once he makes it to the Major Leagues. For fantasy purposes, Lee is going to get a shot to stick with big club out of Spring Training and if he does he could provide some value in deeper dynasty leagues or NL-only formats, but the jury is still out on his long term viability in standard formats.

The biggest glaring weakness on the Dodgers' Major League club was the bullpen. They have one established lefty in JP Howell and a bunch of underachieving right handers outside of Kenley Jensen, who should have the 9th inning locked down for the foreseeable future. However, there are some arms in the pipeline that could offer some help in 2015. Chris Anderson was the Dodgers' 2013 first round pick, and has flashed some plus stuff as a starter but has some real questions about his ability to control his pitches to stick as a starting pitcher. Anderson's fastball can touch 97 and sits in the low to mid 90s as a starter, but the pitch lacks much life which makes it hittable when its in the lower 90s. If the Dodgers choose to push him to the Majors as a reliever, Anderson should be able to show off that plus velocity consistently and that could make him an interesting candidate for a late innings relief role. Anderson isn't someone to roster yet, but sometime this spring or in the first half of 2015 we should see what the Dodgers have in store for the big righty.

The top prospect in the Dodgers system is Joc Pederson, and we caught a glimpse of him when rosters expanded this past September and he should be taken in any expanded fantasy format. However, the logjam in the Dodger outfield limited Pederson to only 38 plate appearances mostly of the pinch hit variety, so we will have to go on his minor league profile to project him. Pederson has been playing full season minor league ball since 2012 and has posted wRC+ of 137 (A Advanced), 155 (Double-A) and 164 (Triple-A) and hit 73 home runs. What makes those numbers more impressive is that Pederson was very young for each stop of full season ball and he still excelled compared to his contemporaries. One issue that people always bring up with young left handed hitting prospects is their ability to hit left handed pitching. According to Baseball Reference, Pederson slashed .290/.415/.580 against lefties and .296/.438/.543 against righties in 2014. Those numbers are encouraging because it shows Pederson can hit left handers even if he struggles early against the more specialized Major League bullpens. Once the Dodgers trade one of their extra outfielders, I could see Pederson hitting in the .260-.270 range with 20-25 homers, which is a legitimate fantasy line.

Alex Guerrero is the Cuban middle infielder the Dodgers signed for $28 million for four years before the 2014 season. Guerrero may have had a shot to fill-in during the inevitable Hanley Ramirez DL stints, but Triple-A teammate Miguel Olivo decided he couldn't wait for the post-game meal and went Hannibal Lecter on the 27 year old and taking a chunk of Guerrero's ear off. The ear incident caused 2014 to be half of a lost season for Guerrero but even before that there were major questions about his ability to hit Major League pitching. The questions along with the emergence of Dee Gordon make Guerrero someone to stay away from until his role is more clearly defined moving forward.

Corey Seager is the final prospect in the Dodgers organization that should be rostered in dynasty and keeper formats. Right now, Seager should start the season at Double-A and may get the call as soon as late 2015 because he can really swing the bat. Seager may not stick at shortstop but he will get every opportunity to do just that, but his bat, which is what matters for fantasy purposes, will play anywhere on the diamond. And if the Dodgers do move him to third his glove should play at an above average level. In 2013, Seager crushed Rookie-A pitching but struggled when promoted to Single-A Advanced. In 2014, Seager destroyed that same Single-A league to the tune of a wRC+ of 167 with 18 bombs in just 80 games and he continued to show off the bat the scouts love in Double-A where he should start the 2015 season. If Seager continues to hit, and there is no reason to believe he won't, then he should see Triple-A at about the midway point of the season with a shot at some playing time at the Major League level towards the end of the campaign.

Top 10 Fantasy Prospects

by Jason Hunt


Our top 10 fantasy prospect rankings are based upon standard 5x5 fantasy baseball leagues, with a balancing of ceiling and present value. While we are having discussions regarding these lists as a collective group, the top 10 fantasy prospect rankings are finalized by the writer listed above. Players are no longer considered prospects once they exceed either 130 at bats, 50 innings pitched, or 45 days of service time in the Majors

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1. Joc Pederson (OF)

Photo Credit: Gary A. Vasquez-USA TODAY Sports
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.294 107 33 78 30
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
591 0.430 0.556 18.44% 27.07%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
22 L L AAA-NL
Roster Status: On 40-Man Roster (3 Options Left)
ETA to Majors: 2015
Our top fantasy prospect in the Dodgers' system a year ago, I think we weren't alone in anticipating that Pederson would graduate from this list and establish himself as a starting outfielder, either in Los Angeles or potentially somewhere else after a trade. The Dodgers had other plans though, as Pederson spent the majority of the season at AAA Albuquerque, putting up ridiculous offensive numbers in the high-offense environment. Pederson was the first player in 80 years to reach the 30 HR/30 SB plateau in the Pacific Coast League, and added a .303 batting average and a league leading 100 walks in just 121 games at AAA. He was called up in September, appearing in 18 games down the stretch.

Pederson was the #11 prospect in my midseason top 50 update, and has the potential to be a five category contributor. None of his tools really jump out ahead of any of the others, but rather is expected to be a solid contributor across the board. He has shown solid power potential at both AA and AAA, and will likely fit in as a 20-25 home run per season hitter. His batting eye is considered to be above-average, and should help him get into hitters' counts as well as draw a solid amount of walks. The speed is real, and should translate into 20-25 steals a season as well.

Long term, Pederson has the potential to be a .280, 25 HR, 25 SB, 90 run, 90 RBI hitter. There were questions about his left/right splits long term, although they did not seem to cause an issue for him in 2014. Defensively, he has played center field primarily, although he may end up needing to move to a corner down the line. Where he plays in 2015 remains to be seen, but Pederson has nothing left to prove in the minors, and hopefully the Dodgers will find a way to get him into the lineup on a regular basis.

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2. Corey Seager (SS)

Photo Credit: Hannah Foslien
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.349 89 20 97 6
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
526 0.402 0.602 7.60% 21.86%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
20 L R A+-AA
Roster Status: Protect after 2016 Season
ETA to Majors: 2016
Taken in the 1st round by the Dodgers back in 2012, Seager has moved quickly through the minor leagues. He returned to High-A Rancho Cucamonga to start this season, and after destroying the level to the tune of a .352/.411/.633 clip, he appeared in the Futures Game in Minnesota on his way to AA Chattanooga. He didn't let up there, either, hitting .345/.381/.534 down the stretch for the Lookouts.

Seager has played shortstop primarily in the minors, although it has been anticipated since he signed that he will end up needing a move to third base down the line. At either position, his performance at the plate will make him a top fantasy option. Multiple reports have Seager pegged as an above-average hitter for both batting average and power, and has already shown that to some extent at the AA level. He's not likely to provide a ton of value in terms of stolen bases, but should be an excellent four category contributor. The secondary numbers and splits point to a hitter that isn't easily exploited, as he has shown a minimal left/right split and also the ability to draw a walk at a respectable rate.

Seager likely returns to AA to start the 2015 season (now in Tulsa), and a call up to the majors could be in line by sometime in the 2016 season. Realistically, he can be a .290+ hitter with 25+ home runs and 90+ RBI each year, while providing that production at either third base or shortstop. The Dodgers did well not to trade him away this year in search of a short-term upgrade, as he is the future at one of the positions for the team. He may be the youngest of the baseball players in his family (his brothers Kyle and Justin are both with the Mariners in the Majors and at Low-A, respectively), but Corey could be the best of the bunch.

20140713_jla_sl8_077

3. Julio Urias (LHP)

Photo Credit: Jerry Lai - USA Today Sports
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
W SV ERA WHIP K
2 0 2.36 1.106 109
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
IP HR/9 GO/AO BB% K%
87.2 0.40 1.07 10.39% 30.62%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
17 R R A+
Roster Status: Protect after 2016 Season
ETA to Majors: 2016

After being the youngest player in the Midwest League in 2013, the Dodgers moved lefty Julio Urias up to the California League, where he was again the youngest by almost a full year. A new level, new year, but very similar results. Despite pitching in the high-offense environs of the Cal League, he posted another low ERA, with an nearly as good FIP (3.36), while throwing 30 more innings than last year.

Urias received rave reports last year about how advanced he was for a player his age, and nothing he did this year changed that trajectory. His three-pitch mix (fastball, curveball, changeup) all have the potential to be plus, and he gets even more out of this with excellent command. There are some reports that he has added a slider as well, although Baseball America noted that this may be more of an arm-slot drop than a different pitch. His delivery is very smooth and repeatable, and overall he should be a mid-rotation starting pitcher with some seasons of even better performance.

The big question at this point is how the Dodgers will continue to move Urias through the minor leagues. There has been speculation that Urias could pitch in the major leagues right now at age 18, but with a single season high of just 92 innings, it could take another two or even three seasons for him to build up to the point where he can fill a rotation spot for a full season in the majors. He'll likely head to AA for the 2015 season, and could be in Los Angeles by the end of the 2016 season.

20130824_jrc_bc4_047.0

4. Grant Holmes (RHP)

Photo Credit: Reid Compton - USA Today Sports
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
W SV ERA WHIP K
2 0 3.72 1.076 58
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
IP HR/9 GO/AO BB% K%
48.1 0.60 2.32 6.63% 29.59%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
18 R R Rk
Roster Status: Protect after 2018 Season
ETA to Majors: 2018

The top draft pick of the Dodgers this year, Holmes signed for a bonus of $2.5 million fairly quickly, and made seven appearances at the Arizona rookie league before being moved to the short-season Pioneer League. He finished up the year with nearly 11 strikeouts per 9 innings, against just under 2.5 walks per 9, along with a 3.72 ERA.

Holmes came out of the draft known for his fastball, which was reported in the high-90's and touching triple digits, and an absolutely nasty power curveball. He also features a changeup which has the potential to be a third above-average offering with more work. As you would expect with a high school draftee, there are things that Holmes will need to work on to reach his potential mid-rotation ceiling. While he did perform well with regard to walks this year, there are multiple reports that he will need to work on his command as he moves through the minors, which may be a result of his delivery. He's an interesting long-term prospect, but he could take a few years to reach the majors and establish himself. Even if he doesn't make it as a starter, he should have a good career working in the back end of the bullpen at worst.

5. Alex Verdugo (OF)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.353 31 3 41 11
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
216 0.421 0.511 9.26% 8.33%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
18 L L Rk
Roster Status: Protect after 2018 Season
ETA to Majors: 2018

A two-way player in high school, Verdugo was drafted by the Dodgers in the second round of the 2014 draft, and will be used as an outfielder. He signed quickly for the exact slot recommendation, forgoing a scholarship to Arizona State University. The Dodgers sent Verdugo to the Arizona rookie league and then onto the Pioneer League in his debut, where he thrived in both offense-friendly environments while playing center field primarily.

There were mixed reports before the draft on whether Verdugo was a better prospect on the mound or in the field, and the Dodgers will clearly give him every opportunity at the plate. He profiles as a corner outfielder down the line, who should be have more than enough arm strength to play right field in the future. As a hitter, Verdugo has the potential to be excellent, providing a strong batting average, solid home run potential, and at least some token stolen bases each season. He seems reasonably likely to head to a full-season assignment for the 2015 season, and we should get a better idea of how likely he is to stay in the outfield with the reports next year.

6. Scott Schebler (OF)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.280 82 28 73 10
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
560 0.365 0.556 8.04% 19.64%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
23 L R AA
Roster Status: Must Protect This Offseason
ETA to Majors: Late 2015

A 26th round pick back in 2010, Schebler has slowly been moving his way toward the majors, and a year ago we were cautiously optimistic about the strength of his performance in the California League. He spent the whole season in 2014 at AA Chattanooga, and quieted a lot of those doubts. He finished the season as the league leader in home runs, extra base hits, and total bases, and was in the top five in runs scored, slugging percentage, and OPS.

Schebler is likely to remain a corner outfielder as he moves up toward the majors, with left field being most likely. As a result, he'll need to continue to hit to provide value to the Dodgers, but he's well on his way toward that. Long term, he has the potential to provide solid home run production, along with a solid batting average. Where he fits into the Dodgers' long-term picture is unclear, but he looks like he can be a major league outfielder in the future, and an interesting one for fantasy when that happens.

20140302_mjr_su5_112.0

7. Zach Lee (RHP)

Photo Credit: Mark J. Rebilas - USA Today Sports
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
W SV ERA WHIP K
7 0 5.38 1.533 97
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
IP HR/9 GO/AO BB% K%
150.2 1.10 1.54 8.10% 14.54%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
22 R R AAA
Roster Status: Must Protect This Offseason
ETA to Majors: 2015

The Dodgers made a huge splash when they were able to get Lee to forego a scholarship to LSU at the signing deadline back in 2010 with a $5 million bonus. After an excellent season in 2013 in his second run at AA, the Dodgers moved Lee up to AAA for the 2014 season, where the performance fell off across the board. It's hard to necessarily even say that it was just the offensive environment in Albuquerque, as Lee actually pitched better at home than on the road.

Lee features a four-pitch mix, with a fastball, slider, and changeup projecting as at least average, and a curveball which might be as well. He throws over-the-top, with a very clean delivery which is very easy and repeatable. I wouldn't necessarily read too much into how his numbers looked this year versus what he can be long-term. He gets a ton of ground balls, and can be a very useful pitcher in most formats even if the strikeouts don't get back into the 7-7.5 per 9 range he has shown in the past. He needs to be added to the 40-man roster this offseason, and it's not out of the realm of possibility that he is in the starting rotation in Los Angeles for most of next year.

8. Chris Anderson (RHP)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
W SV ERA WHIP K
7 0 4.62 1.56 146
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
IP HR/9 GO/AO BB% K%
134.1 0.70 0.98 10.47% 24.25%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
21 R R A+
Roster Status: Protect after 2016 Season
ETA to Majors: 2016

The top pick of the Dodgers in 2013 out of Jacksonville University, Anderson was promoted to High-A for the 2014 season, where he posted excellent strikeout totals, but a high walk rate to go with it. He finished the season on a high note, striking out 10+ in each of his last three starts and pitching at least 6 2/3 innings each time out.

Anderson features a fastball which sits in the low 90s and gets a lot of movement on the pitch. He also throws a slider and changeup which can also be above-average down the line, but both pitches are considered inconsistent currently with flashes of potential. His ability to command all three of his pitches has been an issue since signing, but there were signs of improvement in his last few starts that hopefully will carry forward into 2015.

Anderson has the potential to be a mid-rotation starting pitcher if it all clicks, with the potential some years for even more based on his strikeout potential. I'm very interested to see if he can repeat some of the gains he made in August this year, as he could be much closer to his ceiling if that is the case. He will likely head to AA for the 2015 season, and we could see him in Los Angeles by 2016.

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9. Alex Guerrero (2B)

Photo Credit: Mark J. Rebilas - USA Today Sports
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.322 47 17 57 4
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
321 0.361 0.597 4.67% 17.76%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
27 R R Rk-A+-AAA-MLB
Roster Status: On 40-Man Roster (2 Options Left)
ETA to Majors: 2015

To say it was an interesting season for Guerrero may be just a bit of an undersell. Right after signing it was expected that he'd be the likely starter at second base on Opening Day. An excellent spring training by Dee Gordon gave the Dodgers the option to send Guerrero to AAA to get consistent playing time. Fast forward a month and Guerrero is hitting great when his season is derailed by one of the more unusual incidents in recent memory when he had a portion of his ear bitten off by teammate Miguel Olivo. He missed nearly two months before finishing the season with nine home runs and a .303 batting average after his return.

Guerrero played second base primarily for Albuquerque this year, and long term that is expected to be his best position on the field. He is capable of providing good power production, with 15-20 home runs being a reasonable expectation on a year-to-year basis. He should be solid in terms of batting average as well, which could lead him to be a top 10 second baseman if given an everyday job. He's clearly blocked at least in the short term in Los Angeles with Dee Gordon having an excellent season, but it seems reasonable that Guerrero is installed as the starter before the end of the 2015 season.

10. Julian Leon (C)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.332 39 12 57 1
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
264 0.420 0.565 11.74% 20.08%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
18 R R Rk
Roster Status: Protect after 2016 Season
ETA to Majors: 2018

Signed out of Mexico in 2012, Leon didn't really stand out in his first season, but really put up a strong season this year in Ogden. Despite being one of the youngest players in the league, Leon hit .332 with 12 home runs and a .565 slugging percentage, finishing in the top five in the league in home runs, slugging and OPS.

Leon has the potential to be an high offense catcher, capable of providing above-average production in at least two categories (AVG, HR) and potentially a third (RBI). The part that makes him really interesting is the potential that he can stay behind the plate long-term, which could make him a top five option if it all clicks. He's a long way from the majors still, and at this point is an interesting lottery ticket in deeper formats. That said, it wouldn't surprise me if in a year's time we were looking at a potential top five prospect in the system, capable of being top five at his position when he reaches the majors. That may take another 3-4 years at least, but a strong full-season debut could really lock him in for the future.


Other Interesting Prospects
by Jason Hunt

Jose De Leon - De Leon was the toughest player for me to leave outside the top 10. A 24th round pick for the Dodgers in 2013, De Leon had an excellent year between Ogden and Great Lakes. Completely unranked by Baseball America a year ago, they noted when ranking him as the #3 prospect in the Pioneer League that he had made a change to where he started on the rubber, which has made a world of difference in his performance. He finished the year with double-digit strikeouts in three of his last five starts, including a 14 strikeout performance against Fort Wayne on August 19th. He features a fastball, curveball, and changeup, all of which can potentially be average or better in the future. Add in excellent command, and De Leon has vaulted into the long-term picture for the Dodgers despite his low draft round. He'll likely return to Low-A in 2015, but could move quickly if he performs well there.

Chris Reed - Drafted out of Stanford back in 2011, Reed reached AAA to end his season in 2014 but struggled there in his five starts. He features a three pitch mix of fastball, slider and changeup, but has had issues as a professional with command, leading to high walk totals each year. If he can get the walks under control, he can be a back-end starting pitcher, but until that happens we may only see him as a reliever.

Tom Windle - At this point I actually find the potential of Windle more interesting as a reliever, although he will continue to work as a starting pitcher. He has a solid fastball and slider combination, but has struggled with developing a useful changeup, which could limit him to the bullpen. There is more upside as a starter for him than Reed, but it's less likely that he gets there.





About the Authors

Jason Hunt is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in the minor leagues and prospects
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Brian Creagh is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in fantasy baseball and the minor leagues.
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David Spracale is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in fantasy baseball and the minor leagues.
Follow him on Twitter