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Colorado Rockies 2015 Top Fantasy Prospects

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The prospect staff at Fake Teams kicks off their fantasy prospect rankings and system reviews with an in-depth look at the Colorado Rockies.

What will new general manager Jeff Bridich do with the top prospects in the minors?
What will new general manager Jeff Bridich do with the top prospects in the minors?
Doug Pensinger

Just like last year, the prospect staff here at Fake Teams will be taking an in-depth look at each major league organization, including our top 10 fantasy prospects, an overview of the organization's minor league system as a whole and potential opportunities for playing time in 2015. Our goal is to provide you with more information as you prepare for minor league drafts for dynasty and keeper leagues, as well as look at players that could potentially be worth watching during the spring, as they could be in line to potentially help your fantasy team. We will be reviewing two teams per week until we are through all 30 teams, and you can see the schedule of when your favorite team will be reviewed below. if we have already reviewed the team, a link to the post, along with the team's top prospect is noted.

System Schedule

AL East

AL Central

AL West

NL East

NL Central

NL West

Baltimore
(3/11)

Chicago
(2/11)

Houston
(1/14)

Atlanta
(12/10)

Chicago
(11/12)

Arizona
(Bradley)

Boston
(3/14)

Cleveland
(2/14)

Los Angeles
(1/17)

Miami
(12/13)

Cincinnati
(11/15)

Colorado
(Today)

New York
(3/18)

Detroit
(2/18)

Oakland
(1/21)

New York
(12/17)

Milwaukee
(11/19)

Los Angeles
(10/25)

Tampa Bay
(3/21)

Kansas City
(2/21)

Seattle
(1/24)

Philadelphia
(12/20)

Pittsburgh
(11/22)

San Diego
(10/29)

Toronto
(3/25)

Minnesota
(2/25)

Texas
(1/28)

Washington
(12/24)

St. Louis
(11/26)

San Francisco
(11/1)

Organizational Overview
by Dave Spracale

Since the end of the regular season there has been a shakeup in the front office of the Colorado Rockies, but not one as drastic as many of their fans hoped. The Rockies had often been criticized for their inability to properly use analytics and never having a true organizational direction under the regime of Dan O'Dowd and Bill Geivett, and to be certain they struggled mightily with building a team suited to play in Colorado. The Rockies never seemed to jump into a full rebuild of the organization nor were they ever seen as true contenders by anyone on the outside. Once O'Dowd and Geivett resigned after this most recent 66-96 campaign, there was some excitement over the future of the front office and what it might mean for the longterm success of the franchise. But much of that hope evaporated quickly once Jeff Bridich was announced as their new general manager since he was the farm system director under the same embattled regime. We won't be passing any judgment on the hire, as it does us no good when examining their current prospects in their system but it's helpful to examine where they currently stand as a franchise in order to predict future player development and movement.

As it stands now, the Rockies have two players at the top of their system that should make some impact at the Major League level in 2015 in RHP's Jon Gray and Eddie Butler, and another with a shot at making it to Denver later in the season in LHP Tyler Anderson. Pitching in Coors can be a challenge however, and it may be smart to roster players only in deep dynasty and keeper formats until we see what they do at the next level.

The Rockies do have some impact bats in the pipeline, but all of them are a couple of seasons away from playing in the thin Denver air and making an impact in any meaningful fantasy format. David Dahl has all of the tools to be a star, especially since he appears to be getting over the maturity issues that caused him to be demoted in 2013. Ryan McMahon is left handed, power hitting third baseman that is extremely athletic and should stick at third base long term, and hitting in the rarified air in Denver will only help his fantasy value. But McMahon is only 19 so he's a few years away, but will be a name to keep an eye on as he makes his way through his second year of full season ball with the organization.

Overall, the Rockies have a solid system that is top heavy with pitching and a few impact bats down the line. It will be interesting to see if the new-ish regime will take them down the path of a full rebuild by trading assets like Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos Gonzalez or if they will try and contend in 2015 as the window of effectiveness for those two stars continues to close.

2014 Graduates

The following players have surpassed their rookie maximums of 130 AB, 50 IP, or 45 days of service time.

Charlie Culberson (AB), Tyler Matzek (IP), Yohan Flande (IP), Christian Bergman (IP), Tommy Kahnle (IP), Chad Bettis (IP), Brooks Brown (ST)

Major League Opportunities in 2015
by Dave Spracale

Jon Gray is the consensus #1 prospect in the Rockies organization, and for good reason, Gray possesses a big fastball and a chance to develop into a nice strikeout pitcher down the line. Gray spent all of 2014 at AA Tulsa and posted 22.2% strikeout rate, 8.1% walk rate, a 1.19 WHIP, a 3.91 ERA and a 3.43 FIP in 124.1 innings pitched in his age 22 season in a league with an average age of 24.5 according to Baseball America. These are promising numbers even though the strikeout and walk rates were the worst in his 3 different minor league stops with the organization since being drafted in 2013. Developmentally, the Rockies had Gray smooth out his delivery which caused his velocity to dip a little into the 92-94 MPH range, but this was done purposely in order to work out issues in his delivery. Gray's fastball is already above average and his slider and change-up are both solidly average already with flashes of being plus pitches at the Major League level, so his arsenal should hold up as he continues to develop. Gray will not break camp with the big league club in 2015, but I could see him coming up sometime mid-season, especially if the Rockies are anywhere near competing in the NL West. I actually traded for him in a dynasty league because I am a believer that his stuff could play at Coors Field more so than previous Rockies pitching prospects, and if he can be had at a relatively cheap price I would say he's someone to roster if your league is deep enough.

The second pitching prospect that will be up at some point in 2015 is Eddie Butler, in fact, we even got to see him for 16 innings in a Rockies uniform this season as a 23 year old (now 24), but he spent the majority of 2014 at AA Tulsa. Butler's stuff is legit, he sits in the mid-90s and touches 97 MPH and scouts are pretty sold on his slider being at least an average offering at the Major League level, but again, Coors can effect breaking pitches in ways that aren't really quantifiable at this point. However, there have been some scouts that suggest Butler would be better off as a closer or at least a high leverage reliever in the Show, due to some concerns about durability. But I am of the belief that someone with the stuff and the fastball that Butler currently possesses that all opportunities to be a starting pitcher should be exhausted before making a switch to the bullpen, and I think we'll see the Rockies do just that. With said repertoire, Butler could be a quality mid-rotation type, but again projecting pitchers at Coors can be risky business, but he is worth rostering in dynasty and keeper formats.

Tyler Anderson is the third pitcher in the Rockies organization that could see time in the rotation as early as 2015, but he probably won't see Denver until 2016. Anderson is a big lefty that reminds me a little of the Braves' Alex Wood in terms of delivery and sits in the upper 80s and low 90s with average command. Out of the three pitchers mentioned here, Anderson posted the best ERA (1.98), FIP (2.77) strikeout rate (22.4%) and gave up a measly 0.23 HR/9 in 118.1 innings pitched at AA Tulsa. The numbers are impressive, but most scouts project him as a #4 starter in the Majors, so he's probably someone you should wait and see on before adding him to your team in any fantasy format, especially with the chance that he spends the entire 2015 season at AAA.

As far as impact offensive players for 2015, there is nobody on our top 10 list that will make it to Denver this season as it stands now. Most are in the lower levels of the minor leagues and have only spent a year in full season ball. Trevor Story has the athleticism to stick at shortstop, but there are serious questions about his bat after struggling once he made it to AA, and he is blocked by Tulowitzki. David Dahl could end up being a fantasy stud but he is at least a season and a half away, so he may be someone to add in deeper formats in the offseason before 2016.


Top 10 Fantasy Prospects
by Brian Creagh

Our top 10 fantasy prospect rankings are based upon standard 5x5 fantasy baseball leagues, with a balancing of ceiling and present value. While we are having discussions regarding these lists as a collective group, the top 10 fantasy prospect rankings are finalized by the writer listed above. Players are no longer considered prospects once they exceed either 130 at bats, 50 innings pitched, or 45 days of service time in the Majors

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1. Jon Gray (RHP)

Photo Credit: Rick Scuteri - USA Today Sports
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
W SV ERA WHIP K
10 0 3.91 1.19 113
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
IP HR/9 GO/AO BB% K%
124.1 0.70 0.70 8.07% 22.24%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
22 R R AA
Roster Status: Protect After 2016 Season
ETA to Majors: Late 2015

An absolute beast and a Top 10 fantasy prospect, Jon Gray is the clear #1 prospect in Colorado. A massive right-handed starter, Gray has cruised through the minor leagues with a full AA season already under his belt after being drafted 3rd overall in 2013. A failed drug test (for adderall) his junior year at Oklahoma, and a repertoire more akin to a relief role left some suggesting Gray would ultimately be a reliever heading into the draft. After a few short months in professional baseball it appears those fears were largely overblown and Gray appears to be on a beeline for the anchor spot in Colorado's rotation. He has the body to handle a starter's workload and if he can learn to be more efficient with his pitches, should put up multiple 200+ IP seasons.

Jon Gray features a fastball, slider, changeup mix with the fastball and slider both being plus pitches and the changeup is currently fringe average. The offerings certainly looks like a reliever with two dominant pitches and a third that is not quite where it needs to be, but there is enough feel for the changeup that it will be good enough to keep hitters honest. His fastball sits 93-97 with late, heavy life. The command of the fastball needs work and while it may not show up in his walk rates, on only two occasions Gray worked beyond the 6th inning in a game and many scouts noted his inefficiency in finding the strike zone. The slider is plus with room to develop due to the aforementioned control issues. It is his swing-and-miss pitch and will carry him to above-average strikeout rates at the highest level. The change-up is fringe average and needs some work, but it does have some movement and could take a big step forward if he can learn to become more consistent in his mechanics. This consistency, if found, should clean up the control issues as well and elevate Gray to another level.

The biggest knock on Gray is his delivery, more specifically his landing position and the inconsistencies caused by it. He lands on a stiff, left leg which robs him of the flexibility to release from a consistent point on every pitch. It's not a problem that should leave him susceptible to injury or keep him from making a big impact, but it will likely open him up to mistake pitches and leaving a few up in the zone. That's not a great formula in Colorado, but Gray does have the big stuff, which could help mask that weakness. Lucas Giolito and Noah Syndergaard are the only two pitching prospects that I have clearly above Gray. An argument can be made for guys like Robert Stephenson, and Julio Urias but I put them in roughly the same tier. His numbers will suffer pitching in Colorado, but he will likely become the first universally owned Colorado SP in a long, long time. Expect to see Gray in Colorado at the tail end of next year, maybe earlier if they can compete in the division.

2. David Dahl (OF)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.299 83 14 55 21
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
547 0.335 0.492 5.12% 16.82%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
20 L R A-A+
Roster Status: Protect after 2016 Season
ETA to Majors: 2017

It's been a crazy two years for the value of David Dahl's fantasy stock. After exploding in Rookie ball in 2012, David Dahl was in the top half of almost every Top 100 list heading into 2013. A torn hamstring early in 2013 kept him out the entire rest of the season and a missed flight just before the injury lead many to believe Dahl was lacking in character. The fears were overblown as Dahl put up huge numbers again in 2014 and cemented himself as a Top 25 prospect. Across Low and High A this season, Dahl hit .299/.335/.492 with 14 HRs and 21 SBs spending most of his time as a leadoff hitter. Dahl profiles more as a number 2 or 3 hitter given his budding power, and has the defensive abilities to stick in CF.

Dahl's upside is difficult to beat considering his power/speed combo, quality approach at the plate, and future home ball park. There really isn't any glaring weakness in his game, from a fantasy perspective. His hit tool is more impressive than the power, with the former grading out as plus and the latter somewhere around average. Dahl has a line drive oriented swing and can spray the ball to all fields. The only reason to cast doubt on Dahl's future as a star is the small sample we have of his success. In 3 years of professional baseball, we have seen fewer than 200 games from Dahl and only 29 of those games are above Low-A. 2013 was an unlucky break so it's tough to hold it against him, but he does have another two or three seasons before finding his way to Colorado.

3. Raimel Tapia (OF)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.326 93 9 72 33
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
539 0.382 0.453 6.49% 16.70%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
20 L L A
Roster Status: Must Protect This Offseason
ETA to Majors: 2017

The most polarizing prospect on this list, Raimel Tapia has been the benefactor of a ton of hype that has pumped his stock way, way up (rightfully so in my opinion, but not many share the same feelings). A 20-year old Dominican outfielder, Tapia spent all of 2014 in Low-A with great results - a .326/.382/.453 slash line paired with 9 HRs, 33 SBs (and 16 caught stealing), and a 90:35 K:BB ratio. The numbers are quite impressive and they have been for just about every step in Tapia's minor league career, but due to an unorthodox swing and a profile questionable for the corner outfield, some aren't sure what Raimel Tapia's future holds.

Tapia doesn't look the part of a slugging corner outifled prospect, at 6'2" and 160 lbs he maintains a wiry frame. His body should add some additional weight, which will go hand-in-hand with the development of the power, but it's hard to imagine him ever completely filling out. Raimel Tapia is left-handed hitter, who has the rare ability to barrel just about any pitch thrown his way. Scouts are in agreement that his hit tool rates as a 60+ with a few websites even putting a 70 on it, which is something you don't see very often. The questions start with the power in Tapia's swing. He flashes HR power in batting practice, but you rarely see him display it in the game. Some scouts knock him for this claiming an inability to access his power in-game, while others applaud him for not forcing the power and focusing instead on having a good AB. Time will ultimately tell, but to be conservative, my valuation of Tapia assumes double digit power will never be a factor in his game. He may surprise and become an elite #3 hitter, but I'm profiling him more as a top-of-the-order type.

Speed is another component to Tapia's game that boosts his fantasy stock and compliments the leadoff hitter profile. He's a plus runner, capable of swiping double digit bags. He has 71 SBs in 318 games across the minor leagues, but also 44 caught stealing, which is quite an atrocious success rate. Scouts have noted his inability to get a good jump every time, but knowing he's still in the low levels of the minors there's time for him to improve. From a pure foot speed ability, Tapia projects to be an above-average base stealer.

Finally, I haven't come across a single scouting report for Tapia that doesn't cite his energy and passion for the game. I love to see this out of prospects as it tends to correlate strongly with players who max out all of their tools. Raimel Tapia will hopefully be no exception and could very well top this list next season with the promotion of Butler/Gray and the development of power that could put him close to David Dahl. There's a moderate amount of risk with Tapia, given the uncertainty of the power, and how far away he is from the majors, but the tools are undeniable at this point and he should make an impact in Colorado in the next few years.

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4. Eddie Butler (RHP)

Photo Credit: Rick Scuteri - USA Today Sports
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
W SV ERA WHIP K
7 0 4.327573253 1.36 72
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
IP HR/9 GO/AO BB% K%
133.1 0.81 1.26 7.72% 12.63%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
23 R R AA,AAA,A+,MLB
Roster Status: On 40 Man Roster (2 Options Left)
ETA to Majors: 2015

A brief, 3-start appearance in 2014 gave us a sneak peek at Eddie Butler in Colorado's rotation. The results were not fantastic, a 5.69 FIP, 1.7 K/9 and 3.9 BB/9, but the electric stuff that has moved Butler to the forefront of many prospect lists was on full display. Butler is a RHP standing at 6'2" 180 lbs. with an arsenal that has taken a huge step forward since being drafted 46th overall in 2012 out of Radford University. Butler features a 2-seam fastball, slider, changeup each projecting as average to above-average offerings.

The fastball sits 93-95, occasionally hitting 97 mph, and it is going to break a ton of major league bats. The command of his fastball needs some work, but he throws it with enough consistency to expect average command at the highest level. Butler's slider isn't the devastating pitch you'd expect from a top prospect, but he mixes the break and velocity of the pitch well to keep hitters off balance. He throws it from speeds ranging from 83-88 mph with spotty command. The changeup is his best complimentary pitch and works extremely well off his two-seamer as each pitch has similar late fade. He commands the pitch better than the rest of his pitches, and shows advanced feel for the offering. He throws the change with deception and gets a lot of funny looking swings off it. A few scouts mentioned the use of a curveball, which has some potential, but it wasn't thrown enough to get a great read on it.

The knocks on Butler are his durability and declining strikeout numbers as he rises through the system. The strikeouts, in my opinion, are more a result of the Rockies' organizational philosophy of taking weak contact over strikeouts. Butler has the power arsenal to rack up K's at an above-average rate, but he seems content in riding his power fastball inside on hitters and piling up gopher balls. From a fantasy perspective, you'd prefer the strikeouts, but I believe Butler will find success in either route. The durability concerns stem from various dings Butler has incurred throughout the years, leaving doubt as to whether he can be a 200 IP per year workhorse. This has even lead to some talk of Butler settling in the bullpen where his fastball can play up in the 98-99 mph range. That would make Butler an elite closer if given the option, so his fantasy value wouldn't evaporate, but you'd certainly like him to stick as a starter. Personally, I see a #3 starter out of Butler with average strikeout and walk ratios.

5. Ryan McMahon (3B)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.282 93 18 102 8
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
552 0.358 0.502 9.78% 25.91%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
19 L R A
Roster Status: Protect after 2017 Season
ETA to Majors: 2018

McMahon has far and away the most raw power on this list, and the potential of him in Coors Field in a few years makes me all tingly inside. McMahon is a 19 year old 3B prospect who just completed his first full year in Low-A. The season was a huge success both fundamentally and statistically, as McMahon solidified himself as a defensively-capable third basemen and feasted on more mature pitching to the tune of .282/.358/.502 with 18 HRs and 102 RBIs. The stats are a little skewed given his home ballpark in Asheville is one of the more offensive-friendly fields in all the minors, but all of the scouting reports indicate the underlying skill very much matches the statistical output.

The risks with McMahon include his struggles against left-handed pitchers, a .206/.279/.324 triple slash backs that up, an understanding of just how much his ballpark aided in statistical output, he hit more HRs on the road which is a good sign, and the presence of current 3B stud Nolan Arenado in Colorado. McMahon is still 3 years or so away from reaching the majors so worrying too much about Arenado is a fool's errand. If they wrap Arenado up in a long-term deal, then maybe McMahon's future in Coors should be up for debate, but until then just sit back and let it work itself out. His struggles against lefties are very real, and need to be improved upon for McMahon to break into any Top 50 prospect lists. His strikeout rate is also quite alarming, but it comes with the territory of most power hitters and he walks enough to feel comfortable that he's not up there hacking away. You won't find McMahon on my Top 50 prospect list, but he's close and if he can continue his production outside of Asheville next year, he'll be a Top 50 guy heading into 2016.

6. Kyle Freeland (LHP)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
W SV ERA WHIP K
3 0 1.15 0.92 33
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
IP HR/9 GO/AO BB% K%
39 0.20 2.00 4.05% 22.30%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
21 L L A-Rk
Roster Status: Protect after 2017 Season
ETA to Majors: Late 2016

The big lefty taken 8th overall by Colorado in this year's MLB draft, Kyle Freeland is a college arm who reached Low-A in his first big league season. He doesn't have the power profile of Butler and Gray above him, but he does have above-average stuff and mixes it with great control of all his pitches. Freeland consistently pounds the strikezone, which should help keep his peripherals low. Heading into the draft there were big concerns on Freeland's elbow as conflicting reports on his medicals were circulated. He doesn't have the smoothest delivery as he gets a little herky-jerky when breaking for home plate. That said, he has been healthy his entire career so the concerns could be overblown.

Freeland features a complete fastball, curveball, changeup, slider mix with all projected to be average offerings and none standing above the rest. The fastball works in the low 90's and he can throw it consistently for strikes. It seems to be a case of good control, but not great command, which is something that could spell trouble as he moves up the system if he doesn't clean it up. The slider is his next best pitch and does get some swing and misses. It lacks the sharp bite at the end, but he sets it up well with other pitches and shows different variations of the pitch. Freeland does the same with his changeup giving him a deceptive advantage. It doesn't have a lot of movement on it, but he has feel for it and should develop it with time.

While there is a lot to like with Freeland, I'm taking the cautious approach when valuing him from a fantasy perspective. He isn't going to rack up strikeouts, the delivery will come with injury concerns for the next few years, and he's going to be pitching in Coors Field. I'd be ecstatic to have such a prospect in my farm system if I was a Colorado fan, but there is some hype around him given his 8th overall selection so this may be a case where his fantasy price doesn't justify the value you'll get in return.

7. Forrest Wall (2B)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.318 48 3 24 18
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
188 0.416 0.490 14.36% 17.02%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
18 L R Rk
Roster Status: Protect after 2018 Season
ETA to Majors: 2017

The Rockies second pick in the 2014 MLB draft, Forrest Wall was taken 35th overall out of Orangewood Christian High School in Florida. Some scouts felt he had the best pure hit tool in the draft and the Rockies threw him right into the fire by skipping the complex league and going directly into Rookie ball. Wall responded well to the challenge hitting .318/.416/.490 with 3 HRs and 18 SBs. Wall is a 2B prospect and watching him play it's easy to forget he's a high school prospect. He has the look of a polished college bat who can ride his hit tool quickly through the system.

There is some pop in Wall's bat, but nothing more than low teens at it's peak. He's also a plus runner and could be good for double digit steals down the line. Wall is a unique case having been relegated to 2B so early in his career, but it's important to remember that it was an arm injury that put him there during high school. His athleticism could lend itself to a trial in CF if he can regain the required arm strength for the position. From a fantasy perspective though, I don't see much difference, as I'd prefer Wall to stay at 2B where his AVG/speed combo would be much needed at the position. He'll move quick, but should start at only Low-A next year so he's probably 3 years away.

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8. Tyler Anderson (LHP)

Photo Credit: Rick Scuteri - USA Today Sports
2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
W SV ERA WHIP K
7 0 1.98 1.107 106
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
IP HR/9 GO/AO BB% K%
118.1 0.20 1.35 8.44% 22.36%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
24 R R AA
Roster Status: Must Protect This Offseason
ETA to Majors: Late 2015

Another lefty college arm selected by Colorado, Anderson is a low-ceiling rotation piece that should find sustained success at the big league level. His delivery is not smooth and has a lot of moving parts in it, but Anderson has the athleticism to keep it all together and make it work. The delivery also generates a lot of deception and keeps hitters off balance. Anderson throws a fastball, slider, curveball, and a changeup, with the changeup being the best of the bunch. He sits low 90's with the fastball and commands it well. The changeup generates a lot of swings and misses due to the deception in his delivery. The curveball and slider are both fringe pitches and there are reports he's been throwing a cutter as well. If he can get one of these pitches to compliment his fastball/changeup combo, then Anderson has an excellent profile as a #4 starter.

After 118 innings in AA this year, Anderson looks like a pretty low risk asset for fantasy owners. I'd imagine he gets a crack at a rotation spot sometime mid-2015 and with any sort of success should parlay that into a starting rotation spot heading into 2016. Again, I think the strikeout rates prevent Anderson from being a huge fantasy prospect, but the command is there for him to be a streaming option against teams that struggle versus left-handed pitchers.

9. Trevor Story (SS)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.263 69 14 48 23
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
463 0.367 0.475 12.96% 31.10%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
21 R R AA-A+-A-
Roster Status: Protect after 2015 Season
ETA to Majors: 2016

The Rockies have a ton of fringe-level prospects with SS/2B aspirations and Story is the best of the bunch. He'll stick at SS due to his defensive abilities, but the bat might never be good enough for him to capture the starting role so many thought he was destined for heading into the 2013 season. To Story's credit he has re-working his swing and found some success as a result earlier this year. While repeating Hi-A, Story hit .332/.436/.582 in 50 games with 5 HRs and 20 SBs. Then following a promotion to AA, the wheels fell off as Story managed just a .200/.302/.380 line in 56 games. At this point, it's tough to see Story as anything more than a utility player for the Rockies, which all but erases any fantasy value he may have had. He's worth a flier in the deepest of leagues, but if you can get any sort of return based on his past Top-100 prospect status, take it and run.

10. Terry McClure (OF)

2014 FANTASY STATISTICS
AVG R HR RBI SB
0.254 23 2 21 7
2014 SECONDARY STATISTICS
PA OBP% SLG% BB% K%
169 0.370 0.348 14.20% 29.59%
OTHER INFORMATION
AGE Bats Throws 2014 Levels
18 R R Rk
Roster Status: Protect after 2017 Season
ETA to Majors: 2019

A flier here on the 10th spot. This is a fantasy-centric list and when you get down this low, I'll take the raw, high-upside player with a low probability of cashing out over the low-ceiling #5 starter or utility infielder. That is why McClure lands at the number 10 slot, while he probably won't sniff any other Top 10 lists you look at this off-season. McClure has the potential to be a five-tool stud, but at this point, every single tool is raw and under-developed. He's flashed defensive capabilities of a plus-plus CF and that's likely where he'll stay as he climbs through the system. At 6'2" 190 he has the frame to support the raw power he can show during BP. McClure has an athletic, quick swing but struggles to barrel up balls early in his career. It could take two or three years until it starts to click for McClure, and 4 to 5 years before a promotion is even in the realm of consideration, but if it costs nothing to stash him at the back end of a fantasy farm system, it's a worthwhile investment if it all clicks.

Other Interesting Prospects
by Brian Creagh

Rosell Herrera - A breakout prospect in 2013, Herrera had a monster year in Low-A Asheville last season. Many scouts doubted the numbers as the the swing and approach didn't look like a player capable of consistently hitting double digit HRs and supporting a .300+ AVG. This turned out to be true as Herrera was promoted to Hi-A in 2014 and struggled. He still has a future as a super-utility guy, but there's nothing here from a fantasy perspective unless you're in the deepest of leagues.

Tom Murphy - Murphy missed most of 2014 due to injuries, but he has a shot at getting some serious playing time behind the plate in Colorado. None of his tool stick out, but he's solid across the board and enough power to potentially make a fantasy impact in standard leagues. He's already heading into his age 24 season, so he'll have to hit well and stay healthy to get a crack at making the big league roster.

Kyle Parker - I struggled on whether to include Parker in the Top 10, but ultimately decided to leave him off given the 1B profile. He's hit well at just about every level, but there's a lot of swing and miss that is likely to get exposed at the highest level. Parker has shown in-game power, but I don't know if it's enough to make a 1B profile work. He could be a sneaky mid-season add in re-draft leagues if injuries free up some time for Parker to let his swing loose in Coors.

Jordan Patterson - A guy I loved heading into 2014, Patterson didn't do much to boost his stock. He played a full season in Low-A Asheville and posted a .278/.359/.430 line with 14 HRs and 25 SBs. He's an athletic monster who could hit for power and steal double digit bases, but there's a lot of swing and miss, and he doesn't fit well in a corner outfield spot so it's difficult to project where he lands.

About the Authors

Jason Hunt is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in the minor leagues and prospects
Follow him on Twitter 

Brian Creagh is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in fantasy baseball and the minor leagues.
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David Spracale is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in fantasy baseball and the minor leagues.
Follow him on Twitter