2014 Minor League Keeper Thoughts: Milwaukee Brewers

USA TODAY Sports

The prospect staff at Fake Teams continues their fantasy prospect rankings and system reviews with an in-depth look at the Milwaukee Brewers.

The prospect staff here at Fake Teams will be taking an in-depth look at each major league organization, including our top 10 fantasy prospects, an overview of the organization's minor league system as a whole and potential opportunities for playing time in 2014. Our goal is to provide you with more information as you prepare for minor league drafts for dynasty and keeper leagues, as well as look at players that could potentially be worth watching during the spring, as they could be in line to potentially help your fantasy team. We will be reviewing two teams per week until we are through all 30 teams, and you can see the schedule of when your favorite team will be reviewed below.

System Schedule

AL East

AL Central

AL West

NL East

NL Central

NL West

Baltimore

Chicago

Houston

Atlanta

Chicago

Arizona
(1/9)

Boston

Cleveland

Los Angeles

Miami

Cincinnati

Colorado
(1/13)

New York

Detroit

Oakland

New York

Milwaukee
(Today)

Los Angeles
(1/16)

Tampa Bay

Kansas City

Seattle

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh
(1/2)

San Diego
(1/20)

Toronto

Minnesota

Texas

Washington

St. Louis
(1/6)

San Francisco
(1/23)

Organizational Overview
By Jason Hunt(@jasonsbaseball)

The Brewers finished the 2013 campaign with a 74-88 record, good for 4th in the division ahead of the Cubs. Unfortunately, the biggest story of the year for the team surrounded their star outfielder under fire, as Ryan Braun missed the last 65 games due to suspension related to his involvement in the Biogenesis scandal. The team was already out of the race by that point, 19 games back of the division lead, but played better over the last two months of the season despite the loss of Braun. The team was also derailed by poor performance from key players like Rickie Weeks and injuries to players like Braun, Corey Hart, and Aramis Ramirez.

The team had been very quiet during the 2012-13 offseason, making only a few free agent signings, the most notable being Kyle Lohse to a three-year contract near the end of Spring Training. The draft pick compensation tied to Lohse cost the Brewers the 17th pick in the 2013 draft, a pick that the farm system could desperately have used at the top. Trades dating back to the 2011 season (Marcum, Greinke) had emptied the farm system of a lot of top-end prospects, many of whom have graduated to the major leagues with other teams. They were able to move Zack Greinke at the trade deadline in 2012 for a significant haul, including current starting shortstop Jean Segura.

There were definite bright spots in 2013, with solid performances from some unexpected places. The team let outfielder Khris Davis play everyday after Braun's suspension, and were rewarded with 11 home runs and a .294 batting average in the second half of the season. Jim Henderson took over as the closer in town after John Axford struggled at the start of the year, and recorded 28 saves in 32 opportunities. The key acquisition in the Zack Greinke trade, Jean Segura, emerged as a top 5 fantasy shortstop on the strength of a .294 batting average, 12 home runs and 44 stolen bases. The top overall fantasy performer on the team was center fielder Carlos Gomez, who showed what made him a top prospect years before, hitting .284 with 24 home runs and 40 stolen bases, finishing 9th in the National League MVP voting.

The farm system remains fairly weak, amid a group of drafts that haven't gone as hoped. While the organization graduated a number of draftees this year, there remain questions on a number of the top picks remaining in the minors. 2011 top draft pick Taylor Jungmann took a step forward this year, but his long-term value remains a bit unclear. Jed Bradley, another first rounder from the deep 2011 draft, has struggled mightily since signing and it's not clear that he will get to the majors down the line. There is talent in the system, as Jimmy Nelson could contribute this year and Tyrone Taylor took a big step forward in 2013. That said, there is not a lot of high-ceiling talent in the system right now.

2013 Graduates

The following players have surpassed their rookie maximums of 130 AB, 50 IP, or 45 days of service time prior to September 1st of this year.

Logan Schafer (at bats), Jeff Bianchi (at bats), Scooter Gennett (at bats), Caleb Gindl (at bats), Khris Davis (at bats), Wily Peralta (innings), Brandon Kintzler (innings), Alfredo Figaro (innings), Donovan Hand (innings), Tyler Thornburg (innings), Jim Henderson (innings), Rob Wooten (service time)

Major League Opportunities in 2014
By Jason Hunt(@jasonsbaseball)

There's not a ton of opportunities for prospects to break into the starting lineup for the Brewers, in large part due to the establishment of a number of younger players at key positions. The team found their long-term answer at shortstop in 2013 with the emergence of Jean Segura, but have questions at both second and first base. Rickie Weeks is under contract for the 2014 season, but coming off a disastrous campaign, there have been questions on whether the team might be better suited to play Scooter Gennett there everyday instead. The team had hoped to re-sign Corey Hart to play first base this year, but he chose to sign with Seattle on a $6 million, 1 year contract instead. Juan Francisco remains the starter for now, and we could potentially see Hunter Morris get a shot at the job in spring training as well.

The potential logjam in the outfield was cleared when the team moved Norichika Aoki to the Royals in exchange for reliever Will Smith. This doesn't necessarily create any additional opportunity, as Ryan Braun will move to right field to allow Khris Davis to play every day in left field. The team is set at the other up-the-middle spots with Jonathan Lucroy coming off his best season so far and Carlos Gomez inked to an extension through the 2016 season.

In the rotation, there is likely only one or at best two spots that aren't completely locked down already, with Yovani Gallardo and Kyle Lohse followed up by Marco Estrada and Wily Peralta. Look for Tyler Thornburg to get the first opportunity to win the fifth starter job, who could be challenged by top prospect Jimmy Nelson.

Top 10 Fantasy Prospects
By Brian Creagh(@briancreagh)

Our top 10 fantasy prospect rankings are based upon standard 5x5 fantasy baseball leagues, with a balancing of ceiling and present value. While we are having discussions regarding these lists as a collective group, the top 10 fantasy prospect rankings are finalized by the writer listed above. Players are no longer considered prospects once they exceed either 130 at bats, 50 innings pitched, or 45 days of service time in the Majors prior to September 1st.

20130914_jla_bs6_356.0
Photo Credit: Benny Sieu - USA Today Sports

#1 Jimmy Nelson (RHP)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

W

SV

ERA

WHIP

K

10

0

3.11

1.29

171

SECONDARY STATISTICS

IP

HR/9

GO/AO

BB%

K%

162.1

0.39

1.57

10.1%

24.7%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

24

R/R

On 40 Man Roster (3 Options Remaining)

AA, AAA, MLB

Not the sexiest profile to headline a Top 10 organizational fantasy list, Jimmy Nelson is an advanced arm and received his first cup of coffee in 2013. A former 2nd Round draft pick in 2010, Jimmy Nelson's fantasy value comes from the strikeout potential he showed in his minor league career - a 20-23% K% at almost every stop. Nelson should develop into a top-half of the rotation starter that logs solid innings and racks up strikeouts. There is plenty of fantasy value with that even though he may not have the "Number 2" ceiling of more intriguing arms.

Nelson has an ideal frame, standing 6'5" and 245 lbs and fits the bill of an innings-eating rotation piece. He has a solid four-pitch mix featuring a four-seam and two-seam fastball, a slider, and a changeup. His money pitch is the two-seamer that induces a lot of groundballs. According to MLBFarm.com, Nelson has a career 58% groundball rate. Last season, the only qualified pitchers with a GB% above 50% and a K% over 20% were Felix Hernandez, Stephen Strasburg, A.J. Burnett, and Justin Masterson. Not to say that any of these guys are accurate comps for Nelson, but just to point out that his pitching profile is unique and typically successful by those who can mimic it. His slider and change-up need work but aren't a lost cause or even just "show-me" pitches. They both have potential to be above-average options and give Nelson a full arsenal to keep hitters guessing.

Nelson's most damaging vice is his command and control issues. The problem stems from a delivery that can be difficult for him to duplicate. There's nothing overly complicated with his windup, but it's not the smoothest process and his balance tends to waiver when driving towards home plate causing inconsistent release points on every pitch. The problem seems manageable, and I don't think a high walk total will derail Nelson's fantasy value long-term. Controlling such a large frame can take time and Nelson has the athleticism to reign in his control.

#2 Tyrone Taylor (OF)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

AVG

R

HR

RBI

SB

0.274

69

8

57

19

SECONDARY STATISTICS

PA

OBP%

SLG%

BB%

K%

549

0.338

0.400

6.4%

11.5%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

19

R/R

Not on 40 Man Roster (Protect After 2016 Season)

A

Tyrone Taylor is perhaps Milwaukee's biggest breakout prospect of 2013. After only 18 games in Rookie Ball following his 2nd Round selection in 2012, Taylor was a toolsy outfielder and all projection heading into 2013. The dream started to materialize this season, in 122 Lo-A games Taylor slashed .274/.338/.400 with 8 HRs and 19 SBs and is well on his way to becoming a four or possibly five tool fantasy player.

Taylor could benefit from a more patient approach to the plate after walking only 6.4% of the time last season, but he did still manage an impressive 11.5% strikeout rate so he has already begun to prove his impressive contact skills. His ability to put bat to ball should maximize whatever power utility he can muster and his ultimate HR totals are the biggest question mark in his future fantasy value. He has the short, quick stroke to knock 15 over the fence in a single season, but a change in his approach might dictate otherwise. He still has a few years of development left, but I wouldn't even rule out a 20 HR peak season or two at this point.

Tyrone Taylor is a legit centerfield prospect, so the power doesn't need much in order for him to continue to find playing time. His speed is above average, but his baserunning needs some work. Taylor managed only a 69% success rate on steals so there is some work to be done on learning how to get the right jumps and when to take off. Double digit steals is a real possibility, but the upside is limited due to a lack of plus-plus speed and feel for swiping a bag. Taylor has the most upside of anyone on this list, but he's also one of the younger guys and has a longer road to go in the development system.

#3 Devin Williams (RHP)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

W

SV

ERA

WHIP

K

1

1

3.42

1.46

39

SECONDARY STATISTICS

IP

HR/9

GO/AO

BB%

K%

34.2

0.00

1.91

13.9%

24.7%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

19

R/R

Not On 40 Man Roster (Protect After 2017 Season)

Rk

Last year's top rookie draft acquisition, Devin Williams was selected in the 2nd Round after the Brewers forfeited their first rounder for signing Kyle Lohse. Williams is a right-handed high school arm out of Hazelwood, Missouri and has probably the highest ceiling of any Milwaukee starting pitcher prospect. He stands 6'3" but only 165 lbs and needs to fill out his frame in the next few years. There is a lot to dream about with Williams and everything from his frame, to his arsenal, to his athleticism screams projection.

His fastball sits low-to-mid 90's but could very well maintain 94-95 mph after his body fully matures. He gets good arm-side run on his two-seamer and with improvement in the command, the pitch projects to be plus-plus. The curveball is iffy at the moment and his development of the pitch is largely dependent on the improvement of mechanics mentioned below. His changeup has a lot of potential and currently lacks the feel required to release the changeup with confidence. It's an extremely common case for high school arms and there is no reason to doubt his ability to develop it into an above-average offering.

The improvement of Williams' mechanics is the most crucial part to his development. His delivery is very arm-heavy and he forgets to finish his delivery causing him to fall off-balance and leave a lot of pitches up in the zone. If he can stay on top of his delivery it will help him work down in the zone as well as help him get consistent movement on his breaking pitches, because at present he falls off to the side of his curveball taking away most of his downward movement.

Williams has the "stuff" to succeed at the highest level and he will only need 50/55 grade command in order to succeed. For fantasy owners, he's a solid number 3 starter who should rack up strikeouts but give back some value in WHIP. A big concern with the delivery is him leaving off-speed pitches up in the zone and if this doesn't get fixed, he could give up a lot of dingers in Miller Park.

#4 Victor Roache (OF)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

AVG

R

HR

RBI

SB

0.248

62

22

74

6

SECONDARY STATISTICS

PA

OBP%

SLG%

BB%

K%

519

0.322

0.440

8.9%

26.4%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

22

R/R

Not on 40 Man Roster (Protect After 2015 Season)

A

The second of the Brewers 2012 draft picks, Victor Roache had little chance of falling to the back end of the first round when his college season began, but after breaking his wrist early on in the season, he slid in the draft to a position where the possible reward far outweighed the risk. Roache is a prototypical corner outfield slugger with easy plus power and average grades everywhere else on the scouting report.

Roache received his first taste of professional baseball in 2013 and after a shaky start due in part to his wrist injury, he finished the season with 22 HRs and a .248/.322/.440 slash line. 12 of those HRs came in his final 59 games, 8 of which came in July, where Roache hit .303/.369/.587 and showed what type of damage he could do if everything clicks.

He went down on strikes an unremarkable 26.6% of his ABs, but for an all-power guy like Roache it's a number you can live with. However, this will hamper his batting average numbers and ultimately his overall fantasy value. He's capable of maxing out around 30 HRs and at that level you're on fantasy radars with any average, but we could be talking about Dan Uggla levels of batting average incompetence, where it neutralizes almost any value the power provides.

I do suggest patience in the case of Roache before completely writing him off as a one trick pony. Wrist injuries can take a while to get back from, especially for power hitters like Roache. He showed positive signs in 2013, but he may still have something else in the tank that he hasn't shown us with respect to his overall hitting line. Victor Roache is worth a stash in almost any format given the dearth of power in the majors.

#5 Orlando Arcia (SS)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

AVG

R

HR

RBI

SB

0.251

67

4

39

20

SECONDARY STATISTICS

PA

OBP%

SLG%

BB%

K%

486

0.314

0.333

7.2%

8.2%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

19

R/R

Not on 40 Man Roster (Protect After 2014 Season)

A

Currently a glove-first SS from Venezuela, Orlando Arcia is the younger brother to Minnesota Twins' slugger Oswaldo Arcia. Unlike his brother, power isn't Orlando's calling card, but rather a defensive prowess that will keep Arcia at shortstop for his entire career. Arcia is still very young, spending most of 2013 as an 18 year old in the Lo-A Midwest League. He lost some important developmental time with a broken ankle that caused him to miss all of 2012, but Arcia was so far ahead of the curve that it did little to alter his overall timeline.

As is the case with all glove-first shortstop's, fantasy owners need to know if the bat will ever hold its own. In Arcia's case, there isn't much to get excited about, but some stolen base potential could be enough to sustain fantasy relevance. Arcia swiped 20 bags in 2013, which is great to see coming off a broken ankle. The power won't blow you away, but he's hit 10 HRs in 184 professional games so he's more than just empty speed. It's too early to tell, but it wouldn't be a stretch to project a 12/12 season out of Arcia - something only Ian Desmond and Jean Segura managed last season.

There is a long way to go before Arcia makes it to Milwaukee, and with his limited offensive profile, there aren't many leagues where it is worthwhile to stash him for the next 3 seasons. If you can afford to wait, he's a no-doubt SS prospect that should hold down a starting job in some capacity around 2017.

#6 Clint Coulter (C)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

AVG

R

HR

RBI

SB

0.244

38

7

36

3

SECONDARY STATISTICS

PA

OBP%

SLG%

BB%

K%

282

0.314

0.400

7.1%

21.3%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

20

R/R

Not on 40 Man Roster (Protect After 2016 Season)

A, Rk

The Brewers first pick in the 2012 draft was a high school catcher out of Union HS in Washington, Clint Coulter. Coulter is an offensive-minded backstop, which usually means fantasy gold if he can stick behind the plate. Unfortunately, there is a considerable amount of work to be done before Coulter's future behind the dish is secured.

Coulter had an excellent debut in 2012, hitting .302/.439/.444 in 49 games in Rookie League and reports on his catching skills note the transformation from raw to clean in the matter of a few weeks. 2013 saw a step back offensively for Coulter as he bounced between three different levels and mostly in the wrong direction. He started 33 games in Lo-A, and after struggling mightily at the plate was sent back to Arizona Rookie League. He hit well and moved on to the Rookie Pioneer League where he struggled again.

I make this point with most young catchers, as I refuse to put too much stock into the offensive numbers since it's almost impossible to hone your offensive game while learning the nuances of the catcher position. Pitchers come and go in the lower levels so there's always new arms to learn how to control and the footwork/framework demanded from the position is unlike any other on the diamond.

I believe Coulter will make it as a catcher long-term, and my optimism comes from the off-the-chart makeup and work ethic that every scout praises him for. He's the type of natural leader that thrives behind the plate and he's willing to put his offense in the backseat in order to develop his defense. That doesn't mean us fantasy owners should worry that the offense will never come around, just that we need to be patient with our expectations. Coulter is a long, long, long way away from Milwaukee, but catchers with his type of fantasy upside are worth waiting on.

#7 Johnny Hellweg (RHP)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

W

SV

ERA

WHIP

K

14

0

3.85

1.59

102

SECONDARY STATISTICS

IP

HR/9

GO/AO

BB%

K%

161.4

0.50

1.88

14.8%

13.8%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

25

R/R

On 40 Man Roster (1 Option Remaining)

AAA, MLB

One of the most physically imposing pitchers, Johnny Hellweg is a mountain of a man, standing 6'9" and pumping mid-90's heat on a consistent basis. If that wasn't enough to scare hitters, mix in the fact that not even Johnny always knows where most of his pitches will end up and you have a recipe for chaos. Hellweg was one of the three prospects sent by the Angels, along with Ariel Pena and Jean Segura, in the Zack Greinke deal. Drafted as a college arm way back in 2008, Hellweg is already 25 years old and is about to face a critical turning point in his career that will ultimately lead to a determination on his role long-term. He can be unhittable at times, but his strikeout rates have seen a precipitous drop since being moved to the rotation and with the apparent command issues, I wonder if a relief role is almost unavoidable.

The biggest factor working in favor of Hellweg as a long-term starter is the Brewers lack of starting depth in the minors. Wily Peralta and Tyler Thornburg pitched well enough to secure rotation spots behind Lohse, Gallardo, and Estrada and Jimmy Nelson mentioned above is ready for an extended look, but after those six there isn't anything worthwhile in the Brewers organization as far as starting pitching is concerned. Jungmann might garner some consideration, but he's another year away in my opinion.

With the Gallardo trade rumors of last year, and the injury history of Marco Estrada, if there's any chance Hellweg can harness his command to a reasonable level, the Brewers are going to take that chance. Hellweg also has a groundball-heavy profile that should fit much better as a starter than as a reliever. I can't recommend rostering Hellweg in any but the deepest of formats, but if he cracks the rotation in 2014 due to performance or injury issues, he is definitely a streaming option as well as a possible long-term solution if he can show any semblance of control.

#8 Taylor Jungmann (RHP)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

W

SV

ERA

WHIP

K

10

0

4.34

1.37

82

SECONDARY STATISTICS

IP

HR/9

GO/AO

BB%

K%

139.1

0.71

1.89

12.3%

13.8%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

24

R/R

Not On 40 Man Roster (Protect After 2014 Season)

AA

Jungmann has had an up-and-down start to his professional career. He pitched well enough out of the gates, going directly to Hi-A after being drafted 12th overall out of the University of Texas. He spent 2012 working on his breaking ball, so the results left reason to believe the numbers would be even better once he could let loose and throw his own pitches. The following year he received a promotion to AA where the production really fell off. A 10-10 record in 139.1 IP, a pedestrian 13.8% K%, an impossible to swallow 12.3% walk rate, and a 4.33 ERA that actually out-performed his 4.84 FIP. Jungmann's struggles continued in 7.1 innings during the Arizona Fall League, but a groin injury and SSS give him a pass there.

The 6'6" right-hander looks like a flame thrower on the mound, but instead he utilizes a pitch-to-contact approach and put up a 3.11 GB/FB ratio in 2013. His fastball sits in the low 90's and occasionally touches 94. He gets excellent plane on his fastball due to his length and causes a ton of weak contact as a result. He seems to have a bit more in the tank, as the fastball can touch mid 90's, so a bullpen role is always a fallback option. His curveball has taken big steps forward and scouts believe he's developed a really good feel for the pitch. He worked solely on improving his hook in the 2012 season and coaches and scouts alike noted he didn't care much for results and wanted only to work on spotting his curveball and increasing his confidence in the pitch. The changeup has also been a work in progress and looked pretty good in 2013. The most telling stat on his development of a changeup has been the normalization of his lefty/righty splits. In 2012 LHH's hit .309 and RHH hit only .224 because Jungmann didn't have the requisite changeup to get lefty's to chase. In 2013 LHH and RHH both hit .232 off Jungmann thanks to an improved changeup.

It's a disappointing projection coming from a 12th overall pick, but Jungmann looks more like a 4th or 5th starter type than the mid-rotation piece the Brewers thought they were certain of. He hasn't been in the development system for a long time so there's definitely room for growth, and I expect Jungmann to repeat AA to start 2014 with a move to AAA sometime mid-season.

#9 Mitch Haniger (OF)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

AVG

R

HR

RBI

SB

0.264

76

11

68

9

SECONDARY STATISTICS

PA

OBP%

SLG%

BB%

K%

543

0.348

0.431

10.5%

16.9%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

23

R/R

Not on 40 Man Roster (Protect After 2015 Season)

A, A+

Selected 38th overall, Mitch Haniger was the Brewers third pick in the 2012 draft after Coulter and Roache. A 4th year college senior out of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Haniger started out as a centerfield prospect, but not many feel he can make it work there long term and a shift to a corner spot is likely in the cards. He does have a big arm, so right field is the more likely landing spot. Regardless, his power needs to take a big step forward before a corner outfield spot becomes a remote possibility, and if the pop doesn't come around Haniger is nothing but a 2nd Division/4th Outfielder type that has little value to fantasy owners.

At 22 years old, Haniger cleaned up Lo-A pitching to the tune of .297/.399/.510 in his first 41 games. This earned him a promotion to Hi-A where he struggled the rest of the season to find his footing. In 88 games for Brevard County, Haniger's walk rate was almost cut in half to 8.8% and his strikeout rate jumped 5% to 18.6% - not unmanageable numbers, but noteworthy trends in the wrong direction.

If the power ever does develop and Haniger finds himself in a starting role worthy of fantasy consideration, don't expect much help in the batting average department because there is some swing and miss in his bat and it isn't likely to support a batting average much higher than .270. He'll likely return to High-A to start the 2014 season.

20130217_jla_ar5_386.0
Photo Credit: Jake Roth - USA Today Sports

#10 Hunter Morris (1B)

FANTASY STATISTICS (ALL LEVELS)

AVG

R

HR

RBI

SB

0.247

61

24

73

3

SECONDARY STATISTICS

PA

OBP%

SLG%

BB%

K%

546

0.310

0.457

7.9%

22.3%

OTHER INFORMATION

AGE ON 1/1/2014

B/T

ROSTER STATUS

LEVELS

25

L/R

On 40 Man Roster (3 Options Remaining)

AAA

A first base prospect who received a ton of pub before the season after mashing 28 bombs in 2012, Hunter Morris took a small step backwards this season. Many projected him to fill the void at first base for Milwaukee until Juan Francisco emerged after coming over from the Atlanta Braves. Coming into 2014, I have no idea where Morris finds playing time with Francisco back at first base and Sean Halton and Martin Maldonado playing there some while offering positional flexibility as well.

If Morris does find an opportunity due to injury or a trade to another organization, he warrants some immediate consideration due to his power potential. He doesn't strike out as much as other prodigious power threats (only 22% last season at AAA), but he doesn't make enough solid contact to support an AVG much higher than .260.

He'll almost never crack a Top 15 positional ranking, but in deeper leagues where late-round power is difficult to find, Hunter Morris is worth consideration. I suspect he will see some major league time in some capacity in 2014, but a return to AAA to start the year is very likely.

Other Interesting Prospects
By Brian Creagh (@briancreagh)

David Goforth - A relief prospect at this point in his career, Goforth deserves recognition here as the most likely farmhand to turn into the Brewers closer. In bursts, he can get the fastball all the way up to 98 mph. He added a cutter in 2011 that gives him an excellent two-pitch mix that works in the back end of a bullpen. Goforth has easy arm strength and crazy-fast arm speed. He struggles with finding a consistent release point causing high walk totals, but it won't prevent him from thriving as a high-leverage reliever.

Jorge Lopez - A projectable, young arm, Jorge Lopez took a big step forward in his first full season of professional baseball. He logged 117 IP in Lo-A with just under a 2:1 K/BB ratio. His 5.23 ERA looks troubling, but he had an unlucky 62.3% strand rate and the high number is not indicative of the way he pitched. Lopez was a second round pick in 2012, and with a 6'4", 165 lb frame, there is a lot of room to grow. Lopez can already spin a curveball with consistency and his low-90's fastball will gain a few ticks as he matures. In a system devoid of projectable, starting pitching prospects Lopez is a sight for sore eyes.

About the Authors

Jason Hunt is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in the minor leagues and prospects.
Follow him on Twitter

Brian Creagh is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in fantasy baseball and the minor leagues.
Follow him on Twitter

Matt Mattingly is a contributing writer for Fake Teams, specializing in fantasy baseball and the minor leagues.
Follow him on Twitter

Sources

Baseball America
Baseball Prospectus
Baseball Reference
Fangraphs
Brew Crew Ball
Vimeo
Youtube

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